Expression or Exploitation: The Gucci Controversy

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Chaos struck the fashion industry after Gucci

premiered their controversial line of straight jacket inspired fashion at Milan fashion week Sept. 17 to Sept. 23.

The line includes dresses, shirts, and jumpsuits all fashioned after the design of straight jackets. 

 “Uniforms, utilitarian clothes, such as straightjackets, were included in the fashion show as the most extreme version of restrictions imposed by society and those who control it,” Alessandro Michele said in an interview with the New York Times.

Gucci views the line as a form of expression, whereas others, including non-bianary model Ayesha Tan-Jones, are protesting the exploitation of mental health issues. 

Tan-Jones walked down the runway for Gucci at Milan fashion week wearing an all white jumpsuit with Mental health is not fashion written on their hands.

It is in bad taste for Gucci to use the imagery of straight jackets and outfits alluding to mental patients while being rolled out on a conveyor belt as if a piece of factory meat.”

— Ayesha Tan-Jones

Tan-Jones and other protesters are calling to mind the history that is associated with straight jackets, and believe they should not be used as a fashion statement. 

 “It is in bad taste for Gucci to use the imagery of straight jackets and outfits alluding to mental patients while being rolled out on a conveyor belt as if a piece of factory meat.” Tan-Jones said in a recent Instagram post.

Gucci has had a long past with offensive and controversial fashion. In Feb. there was controversy surrounding a facemask they made that resembled a blackface minstrel, and were forced to recall the facemask. Also in May, they recalled a head piece that was flagged for cultural appropriation for looking like a Sikh turban.

Tan-Jones has had problems them self with mental health, which is one of the reasons they are so adamant about this topic, and want to call attention to it.

The money Tan-Jones made through their modeling for Gucci was donated to mental health charities.

“I hope we can continue to talk, raise awareness and, most of all, support our loved ones, friends or even strangers in any way we can through their mental health,” Tan-Jones said in an instagram post.

Gucci is exclusively using this line for the Milan fashion week, and these pieces will not be for sale online or in stores.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email